Subscribe via E-mail

Your email:

Follow Me

Mildred Elley Blog

Current Articles | RSS Feed RSS Feed

Five Ways to Succeed as a Medical Billing & Coding Professional

 

Thinking about a career in healthcare information technology? According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the employment for medical records and health information technicians will grow 21 percent between 2010 and 2020, which is faster than the national average. This includes Medical Billing & Coding Professionals.

Become a Medical Billing & Coding ProfessionalMany healthcare providers such as physicians, dentists, physical therapists, and outpatient surgery centers depend on medical billing and coding professionals to ensure they are using proper coding for patient records and insurance forms. If you are interested in a career in Medical Billing and Coding here are the top five things you should know:

1)    Have Strong Analytical Skills

Because medical coding rules are complex, a job as a coder requires strong analytical skills. Coding specialists must pay attention to many details in order to translate records precisely and accurately. They must also be comfortable working and making decisions independently.

2)    Be Comfortable Working With People

While health information technicians spend a lot of their time at a computer, interpersonal skills are also important. You need to be able to communicate well with doctors, nurses, and other medical support staff. You may also spend time working with insurance companies, and be put in a situation where conflicts may arise and will need to be able to remain professional. Medical billers are really in charge of making sure everyone is being billed correctly. Some of this involves talking with patients and/or health insurance companies on a regular basis to make sure all invoices are paid on time. Effective communication skills with employees, providers, patients, and other staff members via written and oral communications is necessary. This is perfect for someone who wants to have a balance of working with people (on the phone) and also spending time evaluating invoices and data.

3)    Make Sure You Are Detail Oriented

Accuracy is extremely important. You should have an eye for detail, be a team player and possess a professional attitude. Always be willing to learn. The ability to concentrate and remember detailed information is critical to success in a career in medical billing or coding. As a coding and billing specialist you must be able to sort through thousands of codes a day with accuracy and speed.

4)    Brush Up On Your Computer Skills

Computer skills are essential in the coding field due to the growing use of health informatics software and electronic health records. It is also helpful if you feel comfortable working with a computer. Take a basic office skills course if you don’t know how you use copiers, printers, scanners and fax machines. Update your skills relating to word processing or spreadsheet software, which are needed to draft letters and bills, print documents, and communicate with insurance, billing and doctors’ offices.

5)    Increase Your Knowledge of Medical Terminology

Knowledge of medical terminology is very important for reading and grasping the contents of a patient's chart. Understanding of medical billing and coding guidelines and principles is important in patient diagnoses and procedure codes for accurate reporting. Being familiar with this medical terminology will help you better explain patient conditions to carriers to receive correct reimbursement and reduce claims denials. The biller should understand coding language and how to read medical invoices. In order to grasp the medical terms and medical billing codes, most employees in the medical billing field need to have training and education.

Mildred Elley online courses offer the convenience, flexibility, and real world skills. Contact one of our admission advisors at (888) 207-1637 to learn more about Mildred Elley’s online programs in medical billing & ICD-10 Coding. Interested in learning more about other online career classes? Discover Mildred Elley's Online Career College for online career training at home.

 

Learn More About Online Classes

AHIMA Credentials: What training do you need?

 

Medical coding and billing is the process of translating information from patient records—treatments, tests, procedures, and diagnoses—into the standardized codes used to bill patients and third-party payers such as insurance companies and Medicare.

billing and coding jobMildred Elley offers online programs in medical billing and coding and teaches to the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) standards so that our graduates are prepared to sit for and pass the AHIMA credentialing exam.

AHIMA credentials are earned through a challenging program of examinations, education, and experience, and maintained through constant review and education. AHIMA certification is an investment in yourself and your long-term career.

AHIMA certification can help you:

  • Improve your earning potential
  • Open the door to more opportunities for career advancement
  • Increase your job flexibility and choices
  • Position yourself for success in a long-term career
  • Provide a foundation of broad and deep understanding
  • Be associated with AHIMA's reputation of integrity and excellence.

Mildred Elley’s online medical coding and billing courses prepare students for national certification and employment. Though not required for employment, national certification will certainly increase your job prospects! Choosing an education at Mildred Elley will prepare you for the CCA and CPC national certification exams.

As a side note, there is a new demand for ICD-10 training because soon all billers and coders must know the ICD-10 coding systems

What is ICD-10?

ICD-9, the version of insurance codes that the United States is using, currently uses a code set with about 17,000 codes whereas the new ICD-10 code set has over 155,000 codes.

The new codes for ICD-10 are more specific and more complex, requiring coders to have specialized training in ICD-10 to effectively use them. This emphasis on increased detailed coding is going to create a need for more highly trained coders.

With the shift to more complex codes in ICD-10, it is of key importance to understand the biomedical sciences. Medical terminology, anatomy, physiology, and pharmacology will be even more important for all medical insurance coders.

Mildred Elley has already updated their training to reflect changes from ICD-9 to ICD-10. The advisory board is made up of numerous professionals in career fields so that workplace changes can be immediately passed on to students in our numerous programs.  

In this case, the online career programs Physician-Based Billing and Coding and Hospital-Based Coding, use resources that include up-to-date ICD-10 training.

The difference between the two programs is basically that the Online Physician-Based Billing and Coding Program is designed for those professionals who want to work in doctors' offices and work with outpatient situations.

The Online Hospital-Based Coding Certificate Program trains students to be certified coding associates, giving them the required skills to enter the hospital-based coding profession and work with insurance companies more on an inpatient basis.

Another benefit to Mildred Elley's Online Hospital-Based Coding Certificate Program is that graduates are prepared to take the Certified Coding Associate examination administered by the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA).

ICD-10 coding accuracy is highly important to hospitals and healthcare organizations because of its direct impact on revenues and describing health outcomes.

Opportunities for employment for ICD-10 insurance coders include physicians’ offices, clinics, hospitals, insurance companies and medical supply companies. The demand is driven by the growing need for healthcare services and the continuous need for individuals who are able to handle the complexities of ICD-10 paper and electronic information.

ICD-10 training is also imperative for current ICD-9 coders that need to upgrade their skills from ICD-9 to ICD-10. Mildred Elley is happy to work with experienced coders that already have career experience in the field, but just need to learn ICD-10and the new anatomy and physiology standards.

In the case of employers preparing employees for ICD-10, Mildred Elley is working with individual hospitals and physician's offices to train their employees in ICD-10. All classes are online so Mildred Elley can work with almost any employer that needs employees trained in ICD-10  to comply with future regulations.

Job Outlook for Medical Billers and Coders

The U.S. Department of Labor's 2014-2015 report on the medical records and health information technology field, which includes both medical coders and medical billers, predicts industry employment is projected to grow by 22% from 2012 to 2022. In addition to these new jobs, there will also be open positions as people retire or leave the profession.

In addition to this growth, there is also already an existing shortage of medical coding professionals. This shortage is estimated to be about 30% and is expected to increase to at least 53% with the industry’s shift to ICD-10.

If you feel you’d enjoy working in the field of medical billing and coding and want to learn more about the different fields that our online coding and billing certificate program covers, contact one of our admission representatives at (888) 207-1637. Interested in learning more about other online career classes? Discover Mildred Elley's Online Career College for online career training at home.

 

Learn More About Online Classes

Careers in Law Enforcement: Crime Scene Transcriptionist

 

The demand for law enforcement transcriptionists is rapidly growing. Performing this kind of crime scene transcription is, however, more than just being able to type fast or without typos. Fortunately, there is a training program called Non-Medical Transcription that can get you off and running on this great career path.

crime scene jobsYou can complete transcription training that includes law enforcement transcription training in as little as 10 weeks and pursue a career as a crime scene transcriptionist, an insurance transcriptionist, general business transcriptionist or even find your own niche transcription business as a freelancer.

Law enforcement transcription is no different than any other type of professional transcription service.  After receiving the digital video or audio file, the transcriber carefully listens to the material and transcribes it verbatim to a written format. Once the transcript is finished, it is reviewed and proofread by one or more persons to ensure complete accuracy.  When the transcript is finished, it is returned to the client in the desired digital or hard copy format.

Confidentiality is the number one concern when it comes to important police transcripts. Privacy and security is critcal in a career as a crime scene transcriptionist in the law enforcement field. 

The law enforcement reports are vital as part of judicial evidence. These reports may be correspondence, interviews of witnesses/victims/suspects, interrogations, telephone interviews, field dictation, IRS audits, private investigations, undercover recordings, security tapes, wire-taps/body bugs, surveillance reports, PACE (Police and criminal evidence) interviews, police reports, police scene recordings, recorded statements, traffic accident reports, fire reports, crime scene investigations, jail phone calls, and much more. Accuracy in transcribing these reports is essential to ensure that the report is accepted as evidence.

Today, police cruisers now offer law enforcement professionals the ability to verbally dictate and record traffic accidents or violations as they occur or immediately thereafter.  Officers in the field can carry hand held digital recording devices for similar purposes.  This gives the police officer the ability to record his or her thoughts onsite, without the need for recall later.

This has made law enforcement transcription much easier and has increased the need for transcribers in this field. There’s never been a better time to be a work-at-home transcriptionist!

Online career classes for the Non-Medical Transcription program at Mildred Elley include instruction in typing verbatim conversations, the proper use of equipment as well as instruction in terminology, formatting, grammar and punctuation, improper English, including slang, and the importance of confidentiality. This online transcription program can take as little as 10 weeks.

If you feel you’d enjoy working as a Non-Medical transcriptionist and would like to learn more about the different fields that our online non-medical transcription certificate program covers, contact one of our admission representatives at (888) 207-1637. Interested in learning more about other online career classes? Discover Mildred Elley's Online Career College for online career training at home.

 

Learn More About Online Classes

Train in Medical Transcription and Get the Perfect Work-At-Home Job

 

Many people dream of the flexibility and independence that comes with working from home. Medical transcription is a practical work-at-home career. Your duties primarily entail clerical work on a computer, this job can easily be done off-site rather than in a medical office.

go to medical transcription schoolIf you are highly organized and self-motivated, and you prefer working independently, you may excel in this alternative work environment. Moreover, accurate transcribing is an essential service for doctors and other health care providers, and according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics employment of medical transcriptionists is projected to grow 8 percent from 2012 to 2022. Read on to find out all you need to know to start your own freelance career working from home as a medical transcriber.

Medical Transcription may be the right career for you if you are able to work behind a computer for hours at a time, independently, with very little interaction with others. Excellent spelling and hearing skills are necessary as well as a good understanding of grammar and punctuation. Fortunately, if you don't have experience with medical terminology you can train online at a medical transcription school to get some new job skills. A career in medical transcription is ideal for those who are able to work-at-home independently.

Medical transcriptionists convert spoken words (often physician notes and instructions) to create a patient medical record. These records are considered to be legal documents and therefore the medical transcriptionist must be highly accurate. Medical transcriptionists also must follow strict guidelines of confidentiality.

Medical transcriptionists work for doctors’ offices, in hospitals and for third-party medical transcription services. Working as a self-employed transcriptionist also is an option. There are opportunities to work nontraditional hours, part-time or full-time, as an employee or self-employed. It's a pay as you go career, so if you produce more work you get paid more!

Medical transcription is an ideal career for mothers or fathers whose children are off to school, military spouses, and anyone that is interested in working from home.

In addition to hands-on transcribing, students at Mildred Elley's Allied Health online career college are also trained in voice recognition editing and participate in an externship done from the convenience of your own home.

Online students are instructed in industry-related equipment necessary for appropriate job performance, HIPAA regulations, employment opportunities, transcription resources and the use of technology.

If you feel you’d enjoy working as a medical transcriptionist and would like to learn more about our online medical transcription certificate program (live course is  10 months long; self-paced is approximately one year in length - but can be done faster), contact one of our admission representatives at (888) 207-1637.

 

Learn More About Online Classes

How does ICD-10 Postponement Affect My Career?

 

If you are in the insurance coding field or are thinking about joining the ranks of the many medical billing and coding professionals, you know all about the buzz surrounding ICD-10 and how congress has postponed the date for when all insurance coders must transition from ICD-9.

learn icd 10What is ICD-10?

ICD-9, the version of insurance codes that the United States is using, currently uses a code set with about 17,000 codes whereas the new ICD-10 code set has over 155,000 codes.

The new codes for ICD-10 are more specific and more complex, requiring coders to have specialized training in ICD-10 to effectively use them. This emphasis on increased detailed coding is going to create a need for more highly trainer coders.

With the shift to more complex codes in ICD-10, it is of key importance to understand the biomedical sciences. Medical terminology, anatomy, physiology, and pharmacology will be even more important for all medical insurance coders.

Why Was the ICD-10 Roll Out Delayed?

MGMA (Medical Group Management Association) conducted a recent survey that indicates that the overall readiness for ICD-10 preparation has been lagging. Less than 10 percent of responding practices reported that they had made significant progress when rating their overall readiness for ICD-10 implementation. The purpose for delaying the implementation was to make the transition to ICD-10 more cost effective and less disruptive to organizations.

How can I be ready for ICD-10?

Mildred Elley has already updated their training to reflect changes from ICD-9 to ICD-10. The advisory board is made up of numerous professionals in career fields so that workplace changes can be immediately passed on to students in our numerous programs.  

In this case, the online career programs Physician-Based Billing and Coding and Hospital-Based Coding, use resources that include up-to-date ICD-10 training.

The difference between the two programs is basically that the Online Physician-Based Billing and Coding Program is designed for those professionals who want to work in doctors' offices and work with outpatient situations.

The Online Hospital-Based Coding Certificate Program trains students to be certified coding associates, giving them the required skills to enter the hospital-based coding profession and work with insurance companies more on an inpatient basis.

Another benefit to Mildred Elley's Online Hospital-Based Coding Certificate Program is that graduates are prepared to take the Certified Coding Associate examination administered by the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA).

ICD-10 coding accuracy is highly important to hospitals and healthcare organizations because of its direct impact on revenues and describing health outcomes.

Opportunities for employment for ICD-10 insurance coders include physicians’ offices, clinics, hospitals, insurance companies and medical supply companies. The demand is driven by the growing need for healthcare services and the continuous need for individuals who are able to handle the complexities of ICD-10 paper and electronic information.

ICD-10 training is also imperative for current ICD-9 coders that need to upgrade their skills from ICD-9 to ICD-10. Mildred Elley is happy to work with experienced coders that already have career experience in the field, but just need to learn ICD-10 and the new anatomy and physiology standards.

In the case of employers preparing employees for ICD-10, Mildred Elley is working with individual hospitals and physician's offices to train their employees in ICD-10. All classes are online so Mildred Elley can work with almost any employer that needs employees trained in ICD-10  to comply with future regulations.

 

Learn More

 

Why Choose Medical Transcription as Your Career Path

 

If you're looking for a career that will allow you to work from home (if you choose), doesn’t take long to acquire the skills needed, and is in a steady employment sector (healthcare), you can learn through online classes, then take a look at a career as a medical transcriptionist.

medical transcription schoolMedical transcriptionists convert spoken words (often physician notes and instructions) to create a patient medical record. These records are considered to be legal documents and therefore are subject to subpoena, so the transcriptionist must be highly accurate. Transcriptionists also must follow strict standards of confidentiality.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the median hourly rate (half of rates were higher and half were lower) was $16.36. Employment for medical transcriptionists was expected to grow by 8 percent between 2012 and 2022 (considered to be as fast as average, according to the BLS).

Medical transcriptionists work for doctors’ offices, in hospitals and for third-party medical transcription services. Working as a self-employed transcriptionist also is an option.

As for career advancement, a medical transcriptionist could receive additional education and then work as a medical record/health information technician, medial coder, or even a medical records/health information administration (a bachelor’s or master’s degree is required for the latter).

Is a career as a medical transcriptionist right for you? Some of your personal attributes should include:

  • You enjoy working on computers
  • You have a need to provide accurate detailed documents/transcriptions
  • You ay attention to the smallest of details
  • You enjoy talking on the phone
  • You’re very reliable
  • You listen exceptionally well to others (after all, you’re going to be transcribing doctors’ spoken notes/instructions)
  • You understand the importance of meeting deadlines and even thrive in a deadline atmosphere
  • You can work independently, with little or no supervision
  • You don’t mind – or you even enjoy – doing the same type of tasks again and again.
  • You have a high level understanding of grammar, spelling, etc.

If you feel you’d enjoy working as a medical transcriptionist and would like to learn more about our online medical transcription certificate program (live course is  10 months long; self-paced is one year in length), contact one of our admission advisors at (888) 207-1637. Interested in learning more about other online career classes? Discover Mildred Elley's Online Career College for online career training at home.

Ready to enroll?

describe the image

Top Reasons to Choose an Online Career College

 

 

Job Growth in Medical RecordsAs important as a college degree is when it comes to the amount of earnings one can expect to earn during a career (the Pew Research Center in 2010 found that college graduates earned about $1.42 million over a 40-year career, a full $650,000 more than someone who has just a high school diploma), the traditional college experience isn’t for everyone.

Some 18 year olds – or their parents – know that a four-year college experience right out of high school isn't the path they want to take, so they take some time off and go directly to work or in to the armed services.


Still others have been working for a while and decide they want to pursue a four-year degree in their 20s, 30s, 40s, or even 50s and beyond, when work and family obligations make going to classes during the day exceptionally problematic.

Even those who could attend college degree courses geared to working adults may find it difficult to attend in-person classes in the evenings.

So attending courses at an online career college makes sense for these types of individuals.

What are some other great reasons to choose an online career college, no matter what your age or personal/work circumstances? Read below for just a few.online college

  1. Accelerated Programs. Many online degree programs offer accelerated programs, allowing students to complete their degree in a matter of months or in a couple of years.
  2. Variety. Online colleges today offer students a great variety of majors from hospital coding to business management to transcription.
  3. More and more colleges that are fully accredited by respected accrediting bodies now are offering online degree programs. Why is this important? Earning a degree from an accredited college shows employers that your online degree is just as valuable as a degree earned going the traditional route. Let us repeat: your online degree is just as valuable as a degree earned going the traditional route.
  4. Flexibility. Online degree programs often allow you to go at your own pace. This means that you decide when to study, for how long and where.
  5. Affordability. Earning a degree from an online career college program usually is far less expensive than a traditional on-campus program. After all, classrooms don’t need to be lit and heated, professors can teach from the comfort of their own home, there’s no dorm room to live in (and pay for), there are no commuting costs, and there are no cafeteria meals to buy. Online courses save colleges considerably, and they can pass that cost savings on to you!

If you’d like to learn more about how our online college programs in medical transcription,physician based billing and coding, and non-medical transcription coursesonline hospital based coding training, and more, contact one of our recruiters today at (888) 207-1637 or 

Enroll for Online Career Classes Online!https://online.mildred-elley.edu/signup/

Top Ten Resolutions NOT to Make - Thoughts from Mildred Elley

 
Today I’m sitting in my chair trying to think of the best New Year’s Blog ever and it seems that everyone is writing the same blog about great New Year’s Resolutions and how to stick with them throughout the whole year.  So I’m NOT going to write that blog, but rather, I’m going to write about resolutions not to make! So here are my top 10 resolutions that will probably go badly and what to try instead!

  1. Get in Shape. Who thinks about getting in shape in January?!  I write this while the weather people are predicting an arctic front about to hit us full steam ahead.  Even going to the gym requires leaving the house! Instead, how about doing 10 push-ups when you get out of bed, and 10 push-ups before you go to bed.  Oddly enough it will lead to adding sit-ups and crunches before you know it!
  2. New Years ResolutionsEat Healthy.  Here’s the rub - healthy is a subjective definition.  Try using a free journaling app such as My Fitness Pal to see what you actually eat now.  Maybe you are eating healthy, maybe you are just getting too many calories. The other day I actually decided not to eat that cookie because I was too lazy to enter it in the app.
  3. Quit Smoking.  Such a wonderful resolution, but ever so hard!  A better resolution would be to research stop smoking programs.  There are many free and effective ones such as Smoke Free NY.  So for this one, instead of saying you are going to quit smoking say you are going to get help!
  4. Get Organized.  Small steps here…when looking at your mountain of papers littering your desk, kitchen, or living room, it’s a daunting task.  Instead of saying you are going to get organized, try going to an office supply store and getting a good shredder, some file folders and some labels.  Each day, before you do your push-ups and go to bed, take the top 5 papers off the pile and shred them or file them. 
  5. Get Out of Debt. That’s a rather daunting a task!  In order to manage this herculean effort it boils down to paying more on your debts which means either spending less on other things or generating more income to pay off said debt. Therefore,  a much more reasonable resolution is to create a budget.  Need a guideline?  Visit CNNMoney for the basics. 
  6. Go Back to School. In resolution number 5, one of the ways to help with debt was to increase income.  To do that you are going to need some skills! Be smart about it and consider a career school, such as Mildred Elley, where you only pay for classes that apply to the new career that you are considering.  Underwater basket weaving need not apply.
  7. Get a Better Job. Another tough one! To increase your chances of a better job, you’ll need to promote your skills (or get some new ones by getting some career training) and network, network, network.  So let’s change this resolution from “Get a Better Job” to “Rework Your LinkedIn Profile.” Remember to add your school to this one.  Your alumni network can open major doors for you.  Oh, and don’t forget to clean up your Facebook page while you are at it. According to a survey by careerbuilder, 1 in 3 employers reject applicants based on Facebook posts. This survey was done in 2012…I wonder what the statistic is now!
  8. Volunteer. Again, a very robust and ambiguous resolution!  Fortunately a great first step for this one is to post on Facebook. Just post a status update that you are thinking of volunteering and ask if anyone has any great ideas for places or organizations that need help.  Be careful though, you never know when a volunteer position may put you in touch with a great job opportunity!  Feel free to post this request on our Mildred Elley Facebook Pages.  We have lots of followers that can put you in touch with the right people.
  9. Stop Procrastinating. This one, to me personally, is impossible!  So if anyone has any great ideas to help with this one please post below in the comments! (If this post makes it up by midnight, I will be popping that champagne cork for sure.)
  10. Take time for yourself.  This one is tricky. The first thing you need to do to attempt this one is define what that means.  Do you want to relax, do you want to improve your mind, do you want to go on an adventure?  Sit down and really decide what that means to you. From there the path to taking time for yourself will make sense to you and only you.
Have the happiest of new years and may 2014 bring you peace and prosperity!

Want to get started on number 6?
Here's a brochure! Remember...small steps!
Download Your Free Brochure

The Practical Nursing Education Survival Guide

 

The process of earning your Practical Nursing education certificate might seem daunting, and that is perfectly okay. Nursing education is challenging, but also extremely fulfilling. It feels good to overcome a challenge, and even better to know that the end result of your nursing education will be a career in healthcare. Some people, it seems, were simply born to be nurses. Nursing is one of those “dream professions,” which will come up whenever you ask a group of young people what they want to be when they grow up. Many of those same young people carry that desire over all the way through educational programs, and into their careers.

Practical Nursing ProgramIt is also fitting that earning your PN certification is challenging, as the nursing profession itself presents unique challenges unseen in other professions. It is important, though, to look at nursing education as an achievable challenge, not an impossible one. Chances are you have some friends or family who are nurses, and all of them went through the same training as you will. Ahead, you will see some tips on how to achieve success in your nursing education, enjoy the process, and work your way toward a rewarding career in healthcare. 

Have Fun

  • Usually the “have fun” tip comes at the end of this type of list, but it is important to lead off with it, given how many people have probably told you that nursing education is hard work. There is no getting around the fact that nursing school will require hard work on your part, but that doesn't mean you can't enjoy the process. If you are interested enough to enroll in nursing education, chances are you will find the subject matter involved interesting, once you get going. Practical Nursing programs also presents a unique opportunity to meet and befriend people with similar interests.

Set Aside Study Time

  • Many nursing students have families or full-time jobs, which, combined with attending classes, can make finding time to study a difficult proposition. While it is perfectly okay, and even encouraged, to take any opportunity that arises to study, it is also important to set aside regular blocks of time for studying. This will help you develop sound study habits, and give you a time in which all you have to think about is the material in front of you.

Set Goals for Yourself

  • Whether it is putting in extra time to nail down a particularly difficult subject, or simply brushing up on a topic you are comfortable with, it is important to set learning goals. The key is setting goals that are both challenging and able to be achieved. Goals don't have to only be about work habits, either. You may want to set a goal of regular interaction with a professor you respect, or making new friends on campus. Setting goals will help you stay disciplined, and give you an added sense of satisfaction as each goal is completed. When things get frustrating, try to remember that as long as you persevere, you will reach the ultimate goal of PN certification.

Ask Questions

  • Yes, it's cliché to say it, but there really is no such thing as a stupid question. While you are in school, take advantage of the expertise your professors possess. There is no better time to seek clarity on a difficult topic than when you are in school. Besides, chances are if you have a question about something, then someone else in the class does too.

Build a Network

  • Networking isn't only about setting up contacts for potential future jobs, though that's important, too. You can also network with your fellow students. For many people, studying in groups is easier than studying alone. Even if you prefer studying alone, it is helpful to spend some time with your peers. It will give you a chance to look at subject matter from a different point of view, while presenting the opportunity to make some new friends!

Talk to Someone Who Has Been There
  • Sometimes the best thing you can do when you are feeling overwhelmed is talk to someone who has already been through the process. Whether it's a family member, friend, or total stranger, most practicing nurses will be happy to lend an ear to the nursing student. A practicing nurse can give you reassurance, answer questions, or even just allow you to vent.

Overall, nursing education is in many ways a personal journey. Not everyone studies, learns, or succeeds in the same way. While the tips above provide some general guidance, your best bet is to learn what works for you, and stick with it. It may take some trial and error, but by putting in the effort you will be well on your way to becoming a Practical Nurse in no time.

Interested in becoming a practical nurse?  Click below to download a brochure on Mildred Elley's Practical Nursing programs!

 

Download\u002DFree\u002DPractical Nursing Brochure

How to Launch Your Career in Practical Nursing

 

Practical Nursing ProgramPractical Nursing Program

Practical nurse training is essential for having a career in the field of nursing—and may even be helpful in the field of general care taking. More specifically; training will give you the skills that are vitally necessary for understanding some of the clinical terminology and assessments that will allow you to be able to work alongside seasoned medical professionals, and do so comfortably and efficiently.

Nursing is much more technical than the layman would think; each piece of medical equipment is very, very expensive and important, with very specific functions; it's important to be properly trained and familiar with every piece of equipment before ever attempting to handle one — you could damage the equipment, or worse— you could harm a patient!

Alongside that, a practical nursing program will teach you the essential techniques required for aiding patients. There are very specific and specialized techniques involved in nursing; even for seemingly mundane things - like helping an elderly person out of bed safely. Without the proper training, a nurse could hurt themselves or a patient.

But there are also techniques in spotting ailments which are then the nurse's responsibility to report to the doctor; a trained nurse can spot potentially life-threatening ailments that are easily overlooked by people not trained to look for them.

Furthermore; working alongside medical professionals requires a certain level of know-how and comfort with certain situations that can be very difficult to bear if you haven't been drilled on what to do. Doctors and staff working at hospitals and care institutions can be extremely difficult to follow if you're not familiar in theory and careful in practice.

Start Simple

Practical nursing training will get you acclimated to this kind of working environment before you ever end up in a situation that would cause problems or confusion for you or others.

Training truly is the essential first step into any career in nursing; the medical technology has changed to very specific and technical roles that require previously established familiarity; there are practical techniques that have been traditionally developed over time that a nursing professional will have to be caught up on in a scholastic environment before they deal with patients; and the modern medical working environment is a very specialized field that will also require the establishment of familiarity and professionalism.

Look around for universities that you may be able to attend, or technical colleges. If you can't get in to either of those or have a tight budget, there are even online courses and degrees offered for very low prices.

The general idea is to start with something you have some personal calling for; if you're keen on taking care of the elderly, start by applying for a geriatric or retirement home-like institution once you're finished with training. If you're more into helping those who are in dire need right after some sort of accident; you might want to apply for the trauma division of your local hospital.

Practical Nursing is generally a "round-the-clock job," so there's plenty of work hours that need filling, and furthermore the medical industry as a whole is expanding— so it's very possible to find work with relatively little experience past training. In fact it's easiest to start simple with something you're familiar with.

Due to the vast array of different nursing careers; there is quite a bit of difference in the pay for one type of nurse to another. A personal living assistant does not need as much experience to get started, but they get paid a considerable amount less than surgeon's aids. Though, if you ask high-level nurses, it's not unlikely for them to have started out with something like personal living assistance.

Build Experience

Once you have completed the initial practical nursing program, there may be a few courses you might have to take here and there if you're going into different categories of nursing, but mostly it's an experience and connections career. The quality in nurses shows very, very much— so keep a great, respectful and helpful attitude towards patients and you will be noticed by staff. From there it's possible to go almost anywhere in the world; everyone needs to be cared for in at least two parts of their life: beginning and end—nurses are here to do that job; so the job will never go away. The possibilities are almost endless if you're willing to push them as far as they can go as a nurse.

All Posts